1. photo

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    23 hours ago  /  399 notes  /  Source: killolastud.com

  2. across-the-diagonal:

musicalfreestyle:

theriderdiaries:

horsesjumpingcourses:

englishtaught-westerncaught:

mare-moment:

2pointbitch:

becoming-ben-maher:

horse-neigh:

becoming-ben-maher:

stirrupless:

horse-neigh:

EZ To Spot and Ellie Monaco
Devon 2014

sweg

This is an awful sight. The photography is nice but, horrible picture.

Then don’t reblog. It was meant as funny and judging by the notes, 250 people thought it was funny too. Thanks.

Gosh I’m sorry! I didn’t mean to cause offense I just literally meant that the horse doesn’t look comfortable! I tried to stress the photography is great etc. Sorry it I upset you or anything.

EZ to Spot is such an asshole it’s hysterical

BUT I DONT SEE ANYONE COMMENTING ON THE RIDERS FACE I AM CRYING
LIKE THE FUCK SHE WAS GOING TO GIVE WAS LEFT AT HOME

^^

This photo explains horseback riding☆

She has the face…the face that we all have in our heads when we’re dealing with a horse’s antics…”neener-neener-neener, I-call-yo-bullshiit…”

I don’t understand why people are so quick to call the horse an asshole…if he was an asshole why would they bring him to a big show like Devon? Obviously something was up with him at the moment that could of been a spook or a lack of training thing, you can’t tell from the picture. But you can’t just go pointing fingers at the horse who seems a bit uncomfy 

The reason why they were calling him an asshole is because he has a hugeeee personality and tends to want to run full speed at every jump, and when the rider tells him not to do this, this pony usually starts to buck or kick or something along these lines :) he’s an amazing pony with an insane jump, but he is a really difficult ride and is quite sassy

this is disgusting on so many levels fuck

    across-the-diagonal:

    musicalfreestyle:

    theriderdiaries:

    horsesjumpingcourses:

    englishtaught-westerncaught:

    mare-moment:

    2pointbitch:

    becoming-ben-maher:

    horse-neigh:

    becoming-ben-maher:

    stirrupless:

    horse-neigh:

    EZ To Spot and Ellie Monaco

    Devon 2014

    sweg

    This is an awful sight. The photography is nice but, horrible picture.

    Then don’t reblog. It was meant as funny and judging by the notes, 250 people thought it was funny too. Thanks.

    Gosh I’m sorry! I didn’t mean to cause offense I just literally meant that the horse doesn’t look comfortable! I tried to stress the photography is great etc. Sorry it I upset you or anything.

    EZ to Spot is such an asshole it’s hysterical

    BUT I DONT SEE ANYONE COMMENTING ON THE RIDERS FACE I AM CRYING

    LIKE THE FUCK SHE WAS GOING TO GIVE WAS LEFT AT HOME

    ^^

    This photo explains horseback riding☆

    She has the face…the face that we all have in our heads when we’re dealing with a horse’s antics…”neener-neener-neener, I-call-yo-bullshiit…”

    I don’t understand why people are so quick to call the horse an asshole…if he was an asshole why would they bring him to a big show like Devon? Obviously something was up with him at the moment that could of been a spook or a lack of training thing, you can’t tell from the picture. But you can’t just go pointing fingers at the horse who seems a bit uncomfy 

    The reason why they were calling him an asshole is because he has a hugeeee personality and tends to want to run full speed at every jump, and when the rider tells him not to do this, this pony usually starts to buck or kick or something along these lines :) he’s an amazing pony with an insane jump, but he is a really difficult ride and is quite sassy

    this is disgusting on so many levels fuck

    (via thehorselifestyle)

    2 days ago  /  1,268 notes  /  Source: horse-neigh

  3. bridles-and-browbands:

Pedro Torres, world Working equitation champion, and rider with most Working eq winnings displaying piaffe with a loose curb rein.

    bridles-and-browbands:

    Pedro Torres, world Working equitation champion, and rider with most Working eq winnings displaying piaffe with a loose curb rein.

    (via heartofhorselords)

    3 days ago  /  75 notes  /  Source: bridles-and-browbands

  4. scarlettjane22:

@Helen Peppe Photography, Maine

    scarlettjane22:

    @Helen Peppe Photography, Maine

    (via awfuckyeah-horses)

    3 days ago  /  348 notes  /  Source: scarlettjane22

  5. dreamingdressage:

on-white-horses:

piaffe-on-your-ass:

redhead-lass:

Willem van Steenbergen, Haflinger stallion

sweet jesus

hot damn

Hello

    dreamingdressage:

    on-white-horses:

    piaffe-on-your-ass:

    redhead-lass:

    Willem van Steenbergen, Haflinger stallion

    sweet jesus

    hot damn

    Hello

    (via thehorselifestyle)

    3 days ago  /  1,793 notes  /  Source: bala-photography.deviantart.com

  6. equinecanada:

Welsh Mountain Section A Stallion, Riede country’s Nevado

    equinecanada:

    Welsh Mountain Section A Stallion, Riede country’s Nevado

    4 days ago  /  49 notes  /  Source: hengst.info

  7. 4 days ago  /  1,616 notes  /  Source: equus-susurro

  8. Saving Draumur from Serious Pony on Vimeo.

    fivegaited:

    "Saving Draumur" - Here’s a gorgeous video about how good training (i.e. physically strengthening a horse and teaching them good posture) can actually change and improve the horse’s character, creating a more confident and comfortable animal.  

    “This is Draumur *today*. When we began his rehabilitation, he would not take one step without fighting, trying to bite or kick you, and if you asked for trot he would pin his ears and charge. His physical problems led to profound depression— Draumur had lost his intrinsic desire to move.

    Today he is proud, loves to show off, and is stronger than he has ever been. It was a long, slow process to rebuild his posture and rekindle his spirit, but the horse he is now is more than than anyone believed possible given his conformation and what we (incorrectly) assumed was his character.”

    This is something I’ve talked about a lot on this blog, how often people assume that character problems are just part of who their horses are, rather than something that’s been created by poor training/understanding and physical/emotional discomfort.  I’ve said so many times that I’ve seen horses I’ve trained go from being closed off, shut down, and detached to completely changing into engaging, friendly, and sweet characters.  I’ve seen horses go from the bottom of the pecking order in the herd to the very TOP of the pecking order, with no other changes in diet, amount of exercise, or lifestyle - just differences in the quality of training.  The training we give to our horses has the power to change their entire lives for the better (or worse), which is why it is so important to never dismiss a horse’s “bad” behavior by simply saying, “oh this horse is a jerk/asshole/bitch/little shit.”  When you do that, you close off the possibility of improvement.  You say, “she’s a bitch and she always will be.”  You don’t say, “why is she a bitch, and how can I help her overcome this anger?”  Punishment is dismissive, it assumes that the horse knows what he/she is doing is wrong and was able (physically or emotionally) to act otherwise.  Instead, the training program should be altered to find the root of these behavioral problems, and to try to help the horse overcome them - the same way you might try to help an angry or depressed child.  Every horse is different, so you might have to get very creative, and step out of your comfort zone, trying things you never thought you’d try in an attempt to accommodate the horse.  I never thought I’d need to retrain a horse using bridleless work, before I met Glæta and tried to find a solution to her issues with the bit.  She was competing successfully even with these issues, and of course I could have slapped a flash noseband on her and forced her to do the work - but the connection wouldn’t have been true, and besides, it wouldn’t have been right or fair - it wasn’t her fault that she couldn’t connect with me, she had simply never been taught how and instead she had been taught to fear the bit.  I had to find a way to really fix the problem rather than just masking it, if I wanted the horse to truly connect with me, the same way the woman in this video had to get very creative to work through her horse’s problems - and the results speak for themselves.  Today, Glæta trains in a very soft loose ring snaffle with no noseband at all, and she’s no longer closed off and depressed.  Like the horse in the video, she’s now proud, comfortable, and full of life.  To me, horsemanship is not just the physical art of riding or the science of training - there is an emotional understanding component that I feel like no one wants to acknowledge, and to me it’s a very, very important part of being a good and effective trainer.

    (via theclassicalhorse)

    1 week ago  /  165 notes  /  Source: fivegaited

  9. photo

    photo

    1 week ago  /  59 notes  /  Source: transperceneige

  10. photo

    photo

    photo

    1 week ago  /  1,670 notes  /  Source: winddrinkers